COVID-19 Native Youth Toolkit

Our partners at the National Congress of American Indians have released a new toolkit to promote COVID-19 vaccination among Native youth. The toolkit uses information from IHS and CDC to provide American Indian and Alaska Natives access to facts about COVID-19 vaccines and to provide additional resources. The toolkit also includes social media graphics and sample posts that may be shared with families, friends, schools, communities, organizations, tribal nations, and other networks.

COVID-19 Vaccine & Delta Update

1

Stay Hopeful

We'll get through this together.

One Community. One Purpose. 12 tribes compose the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation. You are not alone. We have the resources needed to help you in your time of need.

2

Stay Connected

Social distancing does not mean social isolation.

24% of the tribe are over 55 years old. Protect them by staying socially distant, but remember to reach out to them so they do not become socially isolated. Check in with family, friends and elders by calling, video chatting, or sending an uplifting letter.

3

Stay Home

If you are feeling sick, stay home.

After the Stay-At-Home Order, the infection rate declined by 58%. Stay home when you are sick except to get medical care or to make essential errands. Know the symptoms of COVID-19 which include:

4

Stay Germfree

Help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Wash your hands often. 20 Seconds of hand washing can save lives. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands. Disinfect frequently touched surfaces and high traffic areas daily.

5

Stay Protected

Protect yourself and others: get the vaccine and wear a mask.

Wearing a mask decreases the risk of transmitting the virus by 65%. The combination of getting vaccinated and following the CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19. 

6

Stay Healthy

Boost your immune system to help fight off illness.

Healthy living strategies for your immune system: don’t smoke, eat a healthy diet, stay hydrated, exercise, don’t stress and get enough sleep. Less that 5 hours of sleep a night weakens the immune system.

7

Stay Informed

Our community is more vulnerable to COVID-19.

American Indians are 4 times more likely to die from illness than the general population. This is because of the higher underlying chronic illness and conditions such as:

Experiencing Symptoms?

Testing is available at these locations on and near the reservation

Self Evaluation

If you believe you may have symptoms, take this self assessment to see if you should get tested.

COVID-19 FAQ?

Answered by the Colville Tribal Health and Human Services Division Director

When should people be tested for COVID-19?

You should see your healthcare provider if you have symptoms of COVID-19 (usually we say three or more symptoms), and you and your healthcare provider should decide whether or not, based upon your risk factors, you should be tested. For the most part, healthcare providers are being very careful and are referring everyone who has symptoms to testing.


If you do have symptoms, you should self-quarantine until your results are in, and you should stay home and stay away from others if you are sick, even if your results are negative for COVID-19. If you believe that you were in close contact (usually within 6 feet of someone who has COVID-19 for 15 minutes or longer), then you should also be tested, and this is the advice that our contact tracers will share with close contacts of people who test positive for COVID-19. This especially includes anyone living in a household with a positive patient.


Remember that Flu season is here, and the Flu and COVID-19 have many similar symptoms. The flu is also equally dangerous to many people, so it’s even more important to get your flu vaccine this year.

Exactly what are the vaccines?

IHS is now offering the moderna vaccine. The Moderna vaccine is an mRNA (or messenger) vaccine. It does not contain the COVID-19 virus or any other virus. It is a substance developed by scientists that trains your body to react to the COVID-19 virus and fight it. 

How effective are the vaccines?

More than 90% effective after the second dose.

Are they safe?

Yes. Literally thousands of scientists from different countries, agencies, and companies have worked together to study and develop vaccines that are as safe as any that have ever been produced.

Are COVID-19 vaccines being held to the same safety standards as other vaccines in the United States?

Yes. COVID-19 vaccines are being held to the same safety standards as all other vaccines. Government agencies and scientific groups evaluate the safety of vaccines being given to people in the United States. The COVID-19 vaccines were developed more quickly than other vaccines because of the billions of dollars of resources spent to develop them. Changes in technology, scientific advancements, and working together also helped to increase the speed of development, production, and distribution.

Are there side effects?

Yes, but they are usually mild. Common side effects that you can expect may include injection site pain (shoulder pain or soreness), headache, low fever, a feeling of tiredness/being run down, or body aches. These side effects usually only last 12-24 hours. There have been a very few serious reactions to COVID-19 vaccines. The amount of media coverage would make one think that there are many reactions, but these reactions are actually very rare.

Do people on the reservation have anything to fear when it comes to getting the vaccine?

Vaccines are always scary. It’s a very unnatural thing to let someone stick a needle in your arm and inject anything, but the diseases for which we vaccinate (including SARS-CoV2) are far more deadly and cause far more symptoms than the side effects of any vaccine. Some of the common misconceptions about this vaccine that are floating around the internet have no scientific basis whatsoever. 

Others are exaggerations, but it’s very important that people make an informed decision regarding the COVID-19 (whether you receive the Pfizer vaccine or the Moderna vaccine). All vaccines have possible side effects, including the COVID-19 vaccine, but the serious side effects are very rare, far more rather than serious illness with COVID-19. 

Some of the common side effects of the COVID-19 vaccines do include headache, mild fever, muscle soreness, fatigue, and shoulder pain (at the vaccine site). These side effects usually go away with 12-24 hours and may feel like a mild flu. They are NOT caused by a person getting the disease. These vaccines do not contain the disease COVID-19 but rather a code that tells your body how to fight COVID-19. The COVID-19 vaccines are both effective and safe. 

Should I be vaccinated even if I’ve already had COVID-19?

Yes. The vaccine researchers believe that receiving the vaccine will only improve your immunity to COVID-19.

What vaccines are available?

The vaccine that is currently being distributed by the Indian Health Service clinics and LRCHC is the Moderna vaccine. 

The Johnson and Johnson vaccine has been approved by the FDA and is being distributed in the U.S. 

The Pfizer vaccine is available for youth 12-17 years old and is being distributed at the Omak and Nespelem clinics.

How many doses do I have to get?

With most COVID-19 vaccines, you will need 2 shots in order for them to work. Get the second shot even if you have side effects after the first shot, unless a vaccination provider or your doctor tells you not to get a second shot. It takes time for your body to build protection after any vaccination. COVID-19 vaccines that require 2 shots may not protect you until a week or two after your second shot.

How old do I have to be to receive the vaccine?

The FDA has authorized the vaccine for emergency use for Americans over the age of 12.

When should people be tested for COVID-19?
You should see your healthcare provider if you have symptoms of COVID-19 (usually we say three or more symptoms), and you and your healthcare provider should decide whether or not, based upon your risk factors, you should be tested. For the most part, healthcare providers are being very careful and are referring everyone who has symptoms to testing. If you do have symptoms, you should self-quarantine until your results are in, and you should stay home and stay away from others if you are sick, even if your results are negative for COVID-19. If you believe that you were in close contact (usually within 6 feet of someone who has COVID-19 for 15 minutes or longer), then you should also be tested, and this is the advice that our contact tracers will share with close contacts of people who test positive for COVID-19. This especially includes anyone living in a household with a positive patient. Remember that Flu season is here, and the Flu and COVID-19 have many similar symptoms. The flu is also equally dangerous to many people, so it’s even more important to get your flu vaccine this year.
What is contact tracing and do we have contact tracing on the Colville Reservation?

Contact tracing is the process that happens when our office (HHS) or the county health departments are notified that a person is positive for COVID-19. Our contact tracers reach out to the patient to find out who they may have been in contact with and where they traveled in order to pin down where they may have contracted COVID-19 and who may have been exposed by being in contact with them.

 

It is very important that the people we contact help as much as possible during this process in order to prevent the spread of the virus. Some people call this an investigation, but I don’t like that word, because it sounds like our contact tracers are trying to find out who did something wrong, when our only job is to work WITH the community to stop the spread by helping people to take the precautions they need to take to protect themselves and their community.

Presently there are no significant outbreaks of COVID-19 in any specific community or area, but it has become very clear that we see trends and increases in COVID-19 cases when large gatherings occur, especially when social distancing is not practiced.

Large gatherings on or near the reservation have resulted in some of the most significant increases (short term trends) we’ve seen. The best way to maintain our current downward trend is by continuing to practice social distancing, not gathering in groups of 10 or more and wearing masks when in public, especially when social distance cannot be maintained.

What to do if you have confirmed or suspected COVID-19?
What to do if you were potentially exposed to someone with a confirmed case of COVID-19?
What to do if you have symptoms and have not been around anyone who has been diagnosed with COVID-19?
Recommendations and Guidlines for keeping your workplace safe during the COVID-19 Response

Get The Vaccine

The Pfizer Vaccine is now available for youth 12-17 years old. Please have your legal guardian schedule you an appointment with your primary care provider to receive the vaccine.

Get Back to Normal

The more people that get the vaccine, the sooner that we can get “back to normal” and enjoy all of the fun activities the tribe has to offer: